Erin Healy Blog

Bent, Shot Whiskey Knives Keep Chopping

The June issue of BLADE® magazine features a story about wilderness survivalist Creek Stewart and his line of Whiskey Knives, made by Hank Gevedon and crew at Reptile Toolworks in Mt. Vernon, Kentucky. Whiskey Knives are carefully tested, but Hank likes to destroy a few from time to time to spot-check their quality. He starts by bending a Whiskey Corvid model to show that the hard outer layer of the A36 carbon steel will crack when bent in half, but that the knife will stay intact because of the tough inner core. Then he gets to shooting them. Besides, Hank’s just entertaining to listen to.

A Bent Whiskey Corvid Knife Still Chops and Slices

Hank Shoots A Whiskey Corvid  with an 8mm Mauser FMJ

So what does all that mean to the knife owner? Well, you won’t want to bend your knife in a vise or shoot it at the range, but the following review of the destructive testing explains how the makuri method of construction can produce a sharp, yet tough knife, ideal for hard-use bushcrafting needs.

What Does Destructive Testing Reveal About Whiskey Knives?

Sure They’re Sharp, But How Sharp?

Know How to Sharpen Your Knives

Knife sharpening is a lost art; learn how to keep your knives and tools sharp.

A collection of knives is only as good as it is sharp. Understand how to sharpen all styles of grinds, along with other tips on caring for your collection.

The blades on Whiskey Knives are asymmetrical hollow-ground, meaning that you only need to sharpen one side, the one with the Creek logo on it. The other side just requires a touch-up. Reptile Toolworks puts instructions in the crate with each Whiskey Knife it sends out, but what about your other knives? “Sharpen A Knife, And Care For Your Collection” by BLADE editors covers all aspects of sharpening, demystifying the process and ensuring you have the knowledge to keep your knives sharp at home and in the field.

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